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Richmond Events’ Business Panel Report - Looking across the pond


Business-Panel-Report-image.jpgThere are interesting differences between how organisations seem to function in the US compared with those in the UK. Looking at our most recent two Business Panel reports on how Organisations view themselves we note some key differences:

US Organisations have closer or more productive relationships with IT than UK Companies but are less close to the CEO and to Sales

In the US, Sales is the most adversarial department according to 27% of respondents, clearly causing more problems than IT in second place. In the UK, Sales were regarded as adversarial, but no more so than Finance and IT and only 17% felt sales were a problem – two thirds of the US figure.

The Finance Department is viewed with the greatest contrast on each side of the Atlantic. In the UK it is the most adversarial department according to 18% of respondents. The US is completely different with only 8% saying it causes problems, the least adversarial department apart from the CEO and Production.

CEOs in the UK are regarded as far more responsible for driving the organisation (52%) compared with their counterparts in the US (36%)

Sales departments are regarded equally positively in terms of driving the organisation forward but contrarily in the US there are just as many who view them as holding the organization back. In the UK their positive contribution is regarded as three times as much as the negative one.

In the UK, Finance departments are regarded as three times more likely to impede the progress of the company. In the US they are regarded as just as positive as they are negative.

In the UK, Sales departments are regarded as three times more likely to drive the business forward as impede its progress, in the US Sales are viewed as almost as likely to impede progress as to achieve it.

Non Executive Directors are viewed as quite influential in the UK Board Room but almost irrelevant in the US.

UK Finance Directors are viewed as effective at achieving cost saving in the UK, they are not in the US.

Innovation is greatest in the IT and Marketing departments. The US sees IT as more innovative than Marketing. The UK thinks Marketing is twice as innovative as IT.

There appear more similarities than differences between the US and UK but the differences, including those above, are very interesting.

For full copies of these reports please contact David Clark.

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The Organization - Richmond Events US Business Panel report


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Our US Business panel recently answered a questionnaire on the 'Inner workings of the organization'

An interesting report, giving an overview of who is driving the organization forward, which departments are most popular (and which are less so) and what makes relationships work within an organization

Headline findings:

  • The Operations department is perceived as the closest / most productive ally within an organization, followed by the Finance department. 
  • Asked what produces good working relationships, it’s all about personalities.  If the panel ‘get on’ with their equivalent then there is a greater likelihood that the departments will have a closer, more productive working relationship. 
  • In terms of who the panel have their most adversarial relationship with, Sales is the clear leader, followed by IT. 
  • At the other end of the scale, not many people tend to fall out with the Production department and funnily enough, not with the CEO.  It’s a fair bet that those that did probably weren’t around to answer this questionnaire anyway.
  • Asked who they feel drives their organization forward, remarkably it’s not the CEO but the Operations department.  Just over one third of the panel feel the CEO is successful in driving the organization forward, which leaves the other two thirds who haven’t said as such………….. 
  • Most instrumental in impeding the organization’s progress – unlike who’s driving the organization forward - there is no clear leader, but instead 3 areas that all achieve a similar score.  These are IT (36%), followed very closely by HR (31%) and then Sales (29%).
  • Asked to nominate who was most effective over a series of attributes:
  • Cost saving – Most effective: the Logistics department, least effective: the Marketing department.
  • Profitability – Most is the Sales department, least is IT and HR.
  • Innovation – Most is the IT department, least is the Finance department.
  • Boardroom Influence – Most is the Finance department, least is Logistics.   
  • For almost half of organizations the need to control costs still dominates their thinking.  On a much brighter note a third say they are increasing their investment in certain areas, whilst a further 15% say they’ve got costs under control and are loosening the purse strings a little.
  • The majority of the panel are positive in their views towards their Finance department, with the largest proportion feeling they have been invaluable in cutting costs and preserving jobs.
  • When the panel are facing a difficult colleague, the number one strategy is to build alliances with others: clearly strength in numbers.
  • The number one issue to improve the panel’s working life is less cumbersome decision making processes. 
     
If you would like to receive a full copy of the research please get in touch.

Dow Jones' VP of HR & Talent Management shares the value she gains from attending the CLO & Talent Management Forum


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Dow Jones’ Lorna Hagen, VP of HR & Talent Management, shares the value she gains out of attending The CLO & Talent Management Forum in this unique case study!

Lorna Hagen has attended the CLO & Talent Management Forum for the past two years, and attends because of the senior level peer interaction: “We have great, candid conversations with senior level people at the Forum.  They tell us what’s worked, and what hasn’t: the good, the bad, and the ugly.”  She also attends because she can meet suppliers in a pressure-free environment: “Because of the speed of business and the numbers of initiatives we are working on, I barely have time to take unsolicited supplier calls.  They generally go through our directors, and they need a really compelling idea that ties to our business objectives.  At the Forum, they have a shot at reaching me directly.  And I’ve built lasting relationships with several new suppliers there.”

Download the case study

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